Audubon Society of Ohio
The Cincinnati Chapter of National Audubon Society

Conservation

A critical part of the mission of the Audubon Society of Ohio is to promote conservation values. We particularly emphasize issues of local concern in the Cincinnati area.

Please check back here often to keep abreast of what’s happening in our area.

 

Clean Power Plan

The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency in August. The CPP sets limits on carbon dioxide emissions (CO2) emissions, the first federal limit on carbon pollution from power plants. The 2030 goal is for states collectively to curb CO2 emissions so that emissions are 32% lower than Read More . . .

Native Plants

Native plants play an important role in the local ecosystem. Native plants occur naturally in the region in which they evolved and have developed relationships with other organisms in the area that are mutually beneficial. For instance, native plants provide habitat and nourishment for insects and insects are pollinators for plants. Plants have a specific Read More . . .

Trees Matter

Trees are beauties to behold and more. Trees contribute to life. Trees provide cooling shade in the summer and enable the sun’s warmth to filter through in winter. Trees act as wind shields and can stabilize soil helping to diminish soil erosion. Trees help absorb excess water and slow its drainage in times of heavy Read More . . .

Important Bird Areas in Ohio

A warming world could adversely affect the climate ranges needed by many North American birds as described in Audubon’s Climate Report. Increasing conservation efforts are needed to preserve critical habitats birds need today and in the future. Audubon works to protect habitat by its Important Bird Area Program (IBA) which identifies and conserves areas vital Read More . . .

Birds and Climate Change

The Audubon Climate Report was announced in September 2014. It predicts how climate change could affect the ranges of 588 North American birds. The climate needs for each species of birds studied was defined. “Climate suitability” includes the range of temperature, precipitation, and seasonal changes. Then greenhouse gas emissions data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Read More . . .

Return of the Wild Turkeys

By 1920 wild turkeys were extinct in 18 mid west and northeastern states including Ohio. In many of the New England states they went extinct in the 1800’s. Turkeys are birds of the forest and when farms replaced forests they lost their habitat. Big male”Toms” at 15-24 lbs are easy targets for hunters and wonderful Read More . . .